My pretty little plaything

Hello my name is Chris, my interests are varied but my main obsessions are Tom Welling, Smallville, Clois & Superman, if you don't like this blog pls don't follow I really don't have time for "fandom"
orangeisorange:

Tom with long hair. 

orangeisorange:

Tom with long hair. 

karazor3l:

Bee’s favourite comic book ladies (in no real order) 33/?
Lois Lane

(via cloisismyfairytale)

(Source: kinorri, via kimmiecoo)


Superman/Batman #51

Superman/Batman #51

(via kimmiecoo)

baudyhallee:

Happy 76th year of Clois!

(Source: blenzz, via emeraldnight)

(Source: psychoviolinist)

sherlockfanatics:

Buy Sherlock Merchandise ==> http://bit.ly/1gqVswI

sherlockfanatics:

Buy Sherlock Merchandise ==> http://bit.ly/1gqVswI

smallvilledcmarvel:

In season 4: “Lois.  I’d do anything to get rid of Lois.”    - Clark
In season 9 : “It’s not gonna be that easy to get rid of me.”  -Clark
Help please feels are too much

smallvilledcmarvel:

In season 4: “Lois.  I’d do anything to get rid of Lois.”    - Clark

In season 9 : “It’s not gonna be that easy to get rid of me.”  -Clark

Help please feels are too much

(via cloisfangirling)

I think with Superman we have this opportunity to place this icon within the sort of real world we live in. And I think that, honestly, the thing I was surprised about in response to Superman was how everyone clings to the Christopher Reeve version of Superman, you know? How tightly they cling to those ideas, not really the comic book version but more the movie version… If you really analyze the comic book version of Superman, he’s killed, he’s done all the things– I guess the rules that people associate with Superman in the movie world are not the rules that really apply to him in the comic book world, because those rules are different. He’s done all the things and more that we’ve shown him doing, right? It’s just funny to see people really taking it personally… because I made him real, you know, I made him feel, or made consequences [in] the world. I felt like, it was the same thing in Watchmen. We really wanted to show it wasn’t just like they thought, like the PG-13 version where everyone just gets up and they’re fine. I really wanted to show the violence is real, people get killed or get hurt, and it’s not fun or funny. And I guess for me, it was like I wanted a hero in Superman that was a real hero and sort of reflected the world we live in now…

Zack Snyder [on Superman killing Zod] (via teenageheartthrobjaymek)

two thumbs up, zack!

(via thankyoulordforhenrycavill)

I think this is very thoughtful of Zack, even though I’d argue on the whole “people don’t like Superman killing Zod because they’re nostalgic for the Reeve’s movies”. Because Reeve’s Superman does kill Zod too, in a much, much less desperate situation. And I thought the whole turning back time thing to save Lois and then mindwiping her, are even more frightening in their moral implications. 

Anyway, Zack’s input is very much in line of how I see the reasoning of why the film is the way it is, and I’d like to add some more thoughts on this.

Greg Rucka is very valid in his concerns about MoS being a PG-13 film, where he believes that a Superman movie should always be something that you can take your kids to. However, this is where I think discernment is important. Just because we can’t bring young children to a Superman film, doesn’t mean it’s not a good one. It doesn’t automatically means that it’s grimdark and gritty or uninspiring. 

Let me put it this way — I wouldn’t dream of letting my 10-year-old neighbor’s kid watch MoS on his own with all that visceral violence and mass destruction, and let him watch STM and the animated series instead. But for colleagues of mine who are just getting into Superman or superheroes in general, I would totally recommend MoS to them.

It’s just like with comics too. No way I’m letting my young cousins to read most of the mainstream comics, even some of my favorite Superman stories. Instead, I would buy them all the Tiny Titans and DC animated movies that they can can have. But for a best friend who’s asking for recommendations on superhero films, MoS would be totally #1 on that list.

I also really don’t like the reading that it’s this decision to kill Zod that develops Superman’s no-kill code. It’s a disservice to a fundamental principle of the human decency. No-kill code is not something superheroic — it’s simply understood we don’t go around killing people and taking justice in our own hands, Punisher-style. But there are times when circumstances force us to do things that we don’t want to, because there’s no way out, and there’s no dishonor on that.

People would usually say that, once you do it, you’ll keep doing it. You’ll keep sliding down that slippery slope. But I think that’s too simplistic. Because this is what moral fortitude is all about — the clarity to understand the exact reason why you would stand for a certain moral code, and also to understand when it’s necessary for you to break them. They’re not for you to be worshipped blindly.

I like to think if Clark finds himself in the same situation again, he would still do it, he will still make the same choice.

(via shardsofblu)

reblogging for shardsofblu's added commentary. highlighted some parts which i think were excellently put. 

(via thankyoulordforhenrycavill)

(via whenyourenotsavingtheworld)